Tag Archives: IIF

A BIG BANG, OR NOTHING , by François Leclerc

Guest post. Translated from the French by Tim Gupwell

With the G20 meeting being held in Mexico at the start of the week, our perspective will find itself altered, falsely accustomed as we are to only seeing the debt crisis from a European angle. On the 18th and 19th June, the greats of this world are going to gather in Los Cabos, a tourist resort in Southern Lower California, under the double auspices of debt and global recovery.

To avoid standing idly by whilst confronted by a disaster of its own making, the British Government has just announced a plan to relaunch the economy with banking credit, funded by a Bank of England liquidity programme. In the context of an overall 80 billion programme, there are plans for monthly injections of around 5 billion Pounds (6.1 billion Euros). But the question that needs to be asked is whether the results will be as inconclusive as those obtained from the ECB’s massive injections, or indeed the tireless pursuit of zero-rate loans (from 0% to 0.1%) by the Bank of Japan – still without any further success – and whose 700 billion Euro acquisition programme of private and corporate securities is still in force.

The British Government wants to make these banking loans conditional on the latter making specific commitments, but hasn’t this been heard before? The monetary policy instruments of the Central Banks merely allow more time to be bought, and do not resolve any of the unanswered questions.

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WHEN THE WISE MAN POINTS AT THE MOON… (I), by François Leclerc

Guest post. Translated from the French by Tim Gupwell.

The chaotic ups and downs of the deleveraging process continue inexorably, affecting not only the debt of the member states but also a European banking system which is now in the same mess. What it had been concealing has now been revealed: it is in a very sick and feeble state.

In order to subdue and contain this gradual process, new bail-out instruments have had to be put in place – which are the subject of much debate; their effectiveness is limited since they are part of a debt-reduction strategy which relies predominantly on the staggering of its financing with public funds that are more or less mutualised. What is new about all this is that, as the amount required increases, it is becoming increasingly difficult to raise the funds. This is prompting a consolidation of the private sector (in order to limit the damage and to share the costs), which is, in turn, destabilizing this sector as well.

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THE TOWERING MOUNTAIN, SWAYING FROM SIDE TO SIDE, by François Leclerc

Guest post. Translated from the French by Tim Gupwell.

“There is a first assessment, then a second, a third, a fourth…..It’s the worst possible way of doing things because everybody ends up doing the right thing but at the highest possible cost and price”. Who was it speaking so harshly yesterday of banking losses and of the policies of the European leaders? Answer: The ECB president, Mario Draghi, in the course of a hearing before the European parliament.

With his colleagues from the governing council, he drove home this same point, supporting the creation of the “European banking union” proposed by the Commission, starting with the constitution of a deposit guarantee fund. He was supported by the governor of the Bank of Italy, Ignazio Visco, who is getting ready to lead the charge. Rising Spanish bond rates have driven Italian rates higher; according to sources, the recession is estimated to be between -1.4% and -1.7% for this year, and the official unemployment rate exceeds 10%.

At one moment or another it becomes necessary to face up to reality, and this moment has arrived, manifesting itself in the massive outflows of capital from Spain, calculated by the Bank of Spain at 66.2 billion Euros (according to the latest available figures) for the month of March alone. The withdrawal of deposits is not a fantasy taking the form of long queues at cash machines (which could always occur): it is people with capital and businesses which are fleeing the country.

Added to the collapse of an entire swathe of the Spanish banking system, this phenomenon has suddenly come to dominate the public debt crisis and its corollary the fiscal discipline pact which had aimed to resolve it. Sidestepping the issue, Angela Merkel has declared that the Spanish situation is not the result of the strategy of austerity that she has advocated, but the outcome of the burst property bubble which occurred before its implementation. As if the former did not feed the latter.

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